The Truth About Sales Presenting

Far too often a generic sales presentation is the be-all and end-all for a busy sales team. A single presentation is supposed to work in any situation for any audience. But, let’s face it… does this really work?

How can one sales presentation do the heavy lifting for every situation and every customer? It must work for a creative, equally to a numbers focused decision maker. It must work in 5 minutes and in an hour time slot. It must be highly effective despite variances in presenter style.

That’s a highly demanding standard. One presentation must be the ultimate solution to do it all. Attract. Interest. Engage. Customize. Overcome Objections. Close. In many organizations, legal approval and the slow wheels of corporate decision-making make it next to impossible to change a single word.

While this is a common practice in sales, it doesn’t make much sense. Showing the same thing to everyone at every stage of their interest is foolish. It’s a recipe for disaster.

After all, would you propose marriage to someone you just met? Would you write a formal request to have dinner with your sweetheart? Not likely. Different forms of communication are suited to different situations.

If you are locked in to a formal script and not able to add, change or delete-use these quick tips to add some individuality to your delivery.

1. Arrive Early
Meet and greet participants before you start. Share ideas in informal conversation-even if you must be extremely formal in your on-stage delivery.

2. Get Introduced
Ask your host or hostess to provide an introduction. Give them a personal story or insight to add personality and human touch. Help people understand who you are. You’re more than the person up in front. Get help from the person who is introducing you to set the stage.

3. Draw A Sketch
Whiteboard a key idea, before you start. Use this to connect with your audience and relate human-to-human.

Oops. Can’t draw? Don’t worry. Your sketch does not need to be beautiful in order to work. But if you have to explain endlessly, learn the fundamentals of selling ideas at a whiteboard.

4. Get Your Audience Involved
Ask your audience to draw the same sketch. Encourage people to get into the action-and get engaged in your topic. Don’t worry. The sketch does not need to be perfect or beautiful. Just doing something on the spot and involving participants helps build a connection.

5. Invite Questions During Your Talk
While your script may be set in stone, responding to questions occurs ad hoc. Create a lively interaction during your talk. If you are not comfortable with this flowing environment, make time for questions after you’ve finished the scripted portion of your message.

6. Show and Tell
Provide evidence. Show people what you are talking about. If you must use slides, make sure that you are using the fewest number of slides possible. Get expert advice from an executive coach to amplify your story with visuals and props. If possible, bring in props, photographs and solid items to demonstrate what you’re describing.

7. Smile
Even in the most formal environment, you can smile. Your smile lets participants know that you’re alive and kicking.

8. Stay Late
Stay after the presentation time is over. Be available for questions from anyone. Don’t only talk to the decision maker and ignore other people. By staying attentive and open to all participants, you show care and integrity.

9. Question Authority
If you’ve done all these steps, you have a certain feeling in your gut. You know that you did your best…but you also know that a formal generic script is not serving your goals.

That’s why it’s useful to look for avenues to question the practice of one-size fits all. Find out why this is the case-and where they may be wiggle-room. Who knows what you’ll find out!

Just curious. Do you think your presentation skills will get you the results you deserve?

Creating Graphics For Your Presentation

Presentation graphics have evolved from photographic slides, to overhead transparencies, to power point presentations. The flexibility of power point is such that you can create just about any type of graphic that you desire. Ironically, even though you can generate a slides simple.

The more information you try to convey on a slide, the harder it is for the audience to key in on the most important information. So keep your visual elements simple and to the point. In addition, in a professional talk, it is wise not to include sounds to introduce a new power point slide. After a few slides, the sounds become distracting, then annoying (Daniel, 2004).

There are a lot of details associated with a successful presentation. A high level of preparation is one of them. Your talk is a professional event. This means that you should you should act like a professional. The audience is expecting you to know something they don’t; they are there to gain from your expertise. In addition, they want you to succeed because if you don’t succeed, they will be almost as unhappy as you. They will have to sit through a boring or incoherent presentation. You are likely to be anxious about your talk. Recognizing that fact can help you deal with it; most speakers get nervous. There are ways to deal with anxiety. To begin with, make sure you breathe normally. When people are nervous, they sometimes take gulps of air, talk until the air runs out, then they take another gulp. If you find yourself doing this, finish your sentence, take a breath, and pause a moment. It might also help to have water handy.

Men’s Presents and the Bathurst 1000

Fans of V8 super cars rank the Bathurst 1000 as the utmost of races in Australian motorsports. The Bathurst 1000 draws crowds from fields afar for this spectacular racing event. There are many more knowledgeable people on the actual cars of the Bathurst 1000 than I, but when looking at some mens presents the other day with names such as Hardie Ferodo 500 emblazoned on them, I decided it was time to explore further the history behind such names and the heros behind them.

Significance and History of the Name:
Beginning at Phillip Island as the 1960 Armstrong 500, the 500 mile race, while comparing which makes had the best combinations of speed, ability, and dependability, also held an opportunity for Armstrong to advertise its products, particularly its shock absorbers.

After only three years of use, the track at Phillip Island was worn down and not suitable for racing, so in 1963 the race was moved to the Mount Panorama track in Bathurst, NSW. (for those who may be interested, the Mount Panorama track is aptly named due to the incredible view overlooking the fields around it!) Over the years the race has changed names due to sponsorships, most recently being termed the Supercheap Auto Bathurst 1000, but the legendary merchandise of mens presents still has names such as Hardie Ferodo 500 and Armstrong 500 emblazoned on it.

Cars of the Bathurst 1000:
In the beginnings, the 1960 Armstrong 500 was specifically for only Australian made cars, whereas now it has branched out and included cars such as Nissan, Ford, and the BMW. Holden and Ford still hold the significant titles, and the Big Bangers have gone down in history.

Famous Names of the Bathurst 1000:
While Holden ranks for the highest number of wins for the car make, there are some drivers’ names that have gone down in history as legends of the Bathurst race. Names such as Peter Brock, Bob Jane, and Jim Richards have become household names amongst car racing fans. Why is this so? Peter Brock rightfully earned the title King of the Mountain due to his nine victories, and winners of the Bathurst 1000 now receive the Peter Brock Trophy in honour of this legend. Bob Jane, most commonly known to the general people for his national tyre company, won four successive races, giving him an excellent foundation for his entrepreneurial endeavours in starting his automotive businesses. And Jim Richards? Well, since his beginnings in 1978 until the present day, he still holds the record for the most starts in the race – 35. He has also won the race 7 on seven occasions. Though not as highly ranking as the first three drivers named, Allan Moffat deserves a mention. A Canadian-born man, Moffat is Ford’s most successful driver in the race and in 1977 won his fourth Bathurst 1000.

While this only barely touches on the significance of the Bathurst 1000 in the world of motor sports, I have attempted to give an overview of one of the greatest races in Australian motorsports and explore the significance of some of those legendary titles I saw on various mens presents – the titles that will be remembered down through the years of motor racing.