What is the reason for an air conditioner to blow hot air?

One of the most common reasons for an air conditioner to blow hot air is that it is low on Freon. Freon is a refrigerant that helps to cool the air. When an AC unit is low on this substance, it will no longer be able to effectively cool the air, resulting in hot air being blown from the unit.

Another reason why your split system air conditioner in Melbourne could be blowing hot air could be due to a faulty compressor. The compressor is responsible for circulating the Freon throughout the system. If it is not functioning properly, then the Freon will not be circulated and cooled, leading to hot air being blown from the unit.

Another cause for the air conditioning unit blowing hot air could be due to blocked air filters. The air filter helps to keep the AC unit clean and free of debris. If the filter is blocked, then it will restrict the airflow and cause the unit to blow hot air. You can get the services of heating and cooling companies in Melbourne to get these cleaned on a regular basis.

If you are having issues with your AC unit blowing hot air, then it is best to get it checked out by a professional. They will be able to diagnose the problem and get your AC unit back up and running properly in no time.

A professional company will be able to sort out the problem quickly so that you can enjoy the cool air again. They will also be able to advise you on how to maintain your AC unit and prevent any further issues.

If you want to avoid having to call out a professional, then there are some things that you can do yourself.

Firstly, make sure that you check the air filters and clean them if they are blocked.
Secondly, take a look at the coils and see if they need cleaning. If they are dirty, then this could be restricting the airflow and causing the unit to blow hot air.
Finally, check all of the vents and make sure that they are clear so that the air can flow freely through the unit.

By following these simple tips, you should be able to keep your cooling unit in good working order and avoid any issues with hot air.

The Truth About Sales Presenting

Far too often a generic sales presentation is the be-all and end-all for a busy sales team. A single presentation is supposed to work in any situation for any audience. But, let’s face it… does this really work?

How can one sales presentation do the heavy lifting for every situation and every customer? It must work for a creative, equally to a numbers focused decision maker. It must work in 5 minutes and in an hour time slot. It must be highly effective despite variances in presenter style.

That’s a highly demanding standard. One presentation must be the ultimate solution to do it all. Attract. Interest. Engage. Customize. Overcome Objections. Close. In many organizations, legal approval and the slow wheels of corporate decision-making make it next to impossible to change a single word.

While this is a common practice in sales, it doesn’t make much sense. Showing the same thing to everyone at every stage of their interest is foolish. It’s a recipe for disaster.

After all, would you propose marriage to someone you just met? Would you write a formal request to have dinner with your sweetheart? Not likely. Different forms of communication are suited to different situations.

If you are locked in to a formal script and not able to add, change or delete-use these quick tips to add some individuality to your delivery.

1. Arrive Early
Meet and greet participants before you start. Share ideas in informal conversation-even if you must be extremely formal in your on-stage delivery.

2. Get Introduced
Ask your host or hostess to provide an introduction. Give them a personal story or insight to add personality and human touch. Help people understand who you are. You’re more than the person up in front. Get help from the person who is introducing you to set the stage.

3. Draw A Sketch
Whiteboard a key idea, before you start. Use this to connect with your audience and relate human-to-human.

Oops. Can’t draw? Don’t worry. Your sketch does not need to be beautiful in order to work. But if you have to explain endlessly, learn the fundamentals of selling ideas at a whiteboard.

4. Get Your Audience Involved
Ask your audience to draw the same sketch. Encourage people to get into the action-and get engaged in your topic. Don’t worry. The sketch does not need to be perfect or beautiful. Just doing something on the spot and involving participants helps build a connection.

5. Invite Questions During Your Talk
While your script may be set in stone, responding to questions occurs ad hoc. Create a lively interaction during your talk. If you are not comfortable with this flowing environment, make time for questions after you’ve finished the scripted portion of your message.

6. Show and Tell
Provide evidence. Show people what you are talking about. If you must use slides, make sure that you are using the fewest number of slides possible. Get expert advice from an executive coach to amplify your story with visuals and props. If possible, bring in props, photographs and solid items to demonstrate what you’re describing.

7. Smile
Even in the most formal environment, you can smile. Your smile lets participants know that you’re alive and kicking.

8. Stay Late
Stay after the presentation time is over. Be available for questions from anyone. Don’t only talk to the decision maker and ignore other people. By staying attentive and open to all participants, you show care and integrity.

9. Question Authority
If you’ve done all these steps, you have a certain feeling in your gut. You know that you did your best…but you also know that a formal generic script is not serving your goals.

That’s why it’s useful to look for avenues to question the practice of one-size fits all. Find out why this is the case-and where they may be wiggle-room. Who knows what you’ll find out!

Just curious. Do you think your presentation skills will get you the results you deserve?

The 5-Minute Prep Before You Present: How To Calm Your Nerves

First off, know that it’s completely normal and natural to be nervous before speaking in front of a group.

We are born with two natural fears: loud noises and falling. The other fears are products of our environment including public speaking.

But you can come across as being completely sure of yourself, even if you can’t completely shake the jitters.

Here are a few tips to help you keep your calm before you take the microphone.

1. Wiggle your toes

Studies show that wiggling your toes reduces stress levels and decreases anxiety.

2. Chat with Your Audience Before Your Presentation

Meet and greet people before you get on stage. Talking with audiences makes you seem more likeable and approachable. Ask event attendees questions and take in their responses. They may even give you some inspiration to weave into your talk.

3. Claim the three “audience realities”.

One: They believe you’re the expert, so don’t tell them otherwise.
Two: They want you to succeed, so they’re on your side.
Three: They won’t know when you make a mistake, so don’t broadcast it.

4. Find a Pre Talk song.

Athletes and entertainers use this strategy to focus before they take the stage, or start their sport.

Find a song that gets you pumped up and listen to it backstage before every talk. It has to be “your song”, a song that gets your adrenaline to the perfect level: It has to give you enough so you’re saying “You’ve got this, (insert your name), they are going to love you”. Any song that can make you feel that way is worth taking a few minutes to listen to before jumping on stage. Many athletes do it, why not you.

5. Visualize your success.

Sports psychologists have proven that an athlete’s ability to vividly visualize his or her success creates a higher win rate.,Before your next presentation, mentally walk yourself through the presentation. Picture yourself speaking with confidence and poise; see your audience responding positively.

Nervousness is a natural reaction to speaking in front of large groups. However, try to think of this emotion as a “readiness to share you”, and a type of excitement that is necessary for you to speak. You’ve been sub-consciously programmed to think that you fear it, so how about intentionally creating how you perceive your nervousness? It’s within your control. That simple change of view can change your whole attitude.

It’s time to use the strategies above and take back control of you nerves each and every time you speak.